Classic Head Cent (1808 – 1814)

#1 Classic Head Cent Buyer Las Vegas & Henderson

History of Classic Head Large Cents

During 1805, Robert Patterson, an Irish immigrant, and Principal of the Wilmington Academy in Delaware in the mid-1770s, who left that post to serve in the Revolutionary War, and resumed back to his academic endeavors was chosen by President Thomas Jefferson as one of the five members of the American Philosophical Society. President Jefferson appointed him as Director of the U.S. Mint in that year.

The large, copper cents issued by the Mint during the nation’s formative years underwent frequent changes in design. Four major changes occurred before cent coinage was even five years old, and lesser variations took place with regularity within these basic types. A sense of stability seemed to have been established when the Draped Bust design was introduced in 1796 but it only lasted through 1807, though it had completed 10 full years of production.

Robert Patterson wasn’t satisfied of the Draped Bust design, so, following his appointment as Director of the U.S. Mint, he appointed John Reich to the position of Second Engraver under Chief Engraver Robert Scot. John Reich was an immigrant, coming from the country of Germany as an indentured servant to get away from the Napoleonic Wars. Patterson assigned Reich the responsibility of revamping the designs of U.S. coins for the 1808 issue.

John Reich designed the Classic Head Large Cent. In Reich’s Lady Liberty design in the bust of Classic Head large cent was cruelly characterized as the “artist’s fat mistress” because of the reserved look compared to the previous Draped Bust large cent. Reich’s new design depicted a more reserved Liberty facing left, her curled hair tied with a band with an inscription of the word LIBERTY that cascades over her ear to the base of her shoulders. Thirteen six-point stars frame the portrait, seven to the left and six to the right, and the date it was minted, is located between the star groups at the bottom.

The reverse features a dentilled rim, with the word  UNITED STATES OF AMERICA inscribed in a concentric circle near the rim. In the middle features two laurel branches that are pointing upwards that are forming a circle, and each branch have berries and they are tied on both ends. At the center is the denomination of ONE CENT, the words on separate lines with a centered dot between, and a short horizontal line is under CENT. All coins were minted at Philadelphia and show no mintmark.

The Classic Head large cent started its production on 1808 up until 1814. The Classic Head large cent was originally misnamed as “Turban Head” by coin dealer Édouard Frossard. It was rumored that Lady Liberty was actually portrayed by Dolley Madison. The Classic Head name was not attached to the design until 1868 by Ebenezer Mason. Mason’s label was apparently because of the fillet, Liberty’s narrow headband, that dates to ancient Greece.

What is a Classic Head Large Cent

The Classic Head Large Cent represents new design of large cents in 1808. It is the fifth design in just fifteen years of production. This new type of design was based on the previous large cents but bore little actual resemblance to those previous designs.

The Classic Head Large Cent was designed by John Reich and featured the head of Liberty, facing left for the first time on this denomination. Her hair is in curls cascading from her air down to her shoulders. It is held together by a headband, which is said to have originated in ancient Greece, and therein inscribed the words LIBERTY. For the first time, stars were placed to the portrait on the obverse.  Seven stars are placed to the left and six to the right, one for each of the original states, and the date is struck below the portrait.

The reverse of the large cent featured a different appearance of the same basic design previously used. A wreath of two laurel branch forming a circle that is tied with a ribbon on both ends encircles the word ONE CENT in the center. A horizontal line is placed beneath the denomination. Unlike earlier cents, the denomination was no longer given as 1/100, perhaps an indication that more Americans had learned how to read and write by this time. The word  UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is inscribed in a semi-circle fashion near the rim.

Composition and Specifications of Classic Head Large Cents

Classic Head Large Cents were struck from pure copper, with a weight of 10.89 grams (168 grains) and diameter of approximately 29 millimeters. All pieces have a plain edge.

These are the three conditional factors that determine the value of a Draped Bust Large Cent coins and they are: Red (RD), RB (Red-Brown), BN (Brown). A RD coin is going to have at least 90% original luster as struck by the mint and is the most valuable condition. The luster conditions only apply to mint state coins so any circulated coin will be designated BN.

Specifications of Classic Head Large Cent:
Designer: John Reich
Circulation Mintage: high 1,458,500 (1810), low 218,025 (1811)
Proof Mintage: none known
Denomination: One cent (01/100)
Diameter: 29 mm; plain edge
Metal Content: 100% copper
Weight: 10.89 grams
Varieties: A few known, including 1810, 10 Over 09; 1811, Last 1 Over 0; 1812, Large Date, Small Date; 1814 Plain 4, Crosslet 4 (referring to a short vertical bar at the right end of the 4 crosspiece); and other minor die variations.

How We Grade Classic Head Large Cents

These are the different grades of Classic Head Large Cent:

  • Uncirculated: These are the coins that never made it out onto the open market. They normally have a brand new look or same as how it looked like when it was first minted way back in 1808.
  • Extremely Fine: These coins look the same as uncirculated but it has few minor scratches and chips. These imperfections are noticeable but nothing so large that it will detract from the appearance of the coin.
  • Fine: These coins were likely been circulated for over a long period of time. They have scratches and chips but the letters and numbers on the surface image can still be seen by the naked eye.
  • Good: These are the coins that have been heavily circulated and damaged. The letters and numbers worn away due to deep scratching and smoothing. Most good graded coins are in the worst condition.

We prefer coins that have been graded and certified as authentic by Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) or Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC), though we will still give a fair deal for these coins.

Price Quote for Classic Head Large Cents

We have different estimated prices for each year of production of Classic Head large cents. Prices varies from 1808 to 1814.

For the 1808 Classic Head large cents, the price for Good graded coins reach up to $60; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $390; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reach up to $2,200; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $16,400.

The 1809 Classic Head large cents price for Good graded coins reaches up to $250; for the Fine graded coins, the prices can reach up to $660; while the price for Extremely Fine graded coins can range up to $2,200; and the Uncirculated graded coins reaches up to $14,000.

For the 1810 Classic Head large cents, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $50; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $300; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $1,400; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $11,600.

The 1811 Classic Head large cents price for Good graded coins reaches up to $150; for the Fine graded coins, the prices can reach up to $700; while the price for Extremely Fine graded coins can range up to $2,500; and the Uncirculated graded coins reaches up to $9,700.

The 1812 Classic Head large cents price for Good graded coins reaches up to $90; for the Fine graded coins, the prices can reach up to $300; while the price for Extremely Fine graded coins can range up to $1,700; and the Uncirculated graded coins reaches up to $9,200.

For the 1813 Classic Head large cents, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $170; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $420; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $1,600; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $9,700.

For the 1814 – Plain 4 Classic Head large cents, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $90; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $300; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $1,500; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $9,600.

While the 1814 – Crosslet 4 Classic Head large cents, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $90; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $400; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $1,500; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $9,400.

Uncirculated coins price higher than the other grades because it has never been used or circulated in the open market, and it looks brand new with no imperfections or scratches.

The early years of Classic Head large cent, 1808 to 1810 coins price higher than those in 1811 to 1814 Classic Head large cent coins because of their rarity. But those coins that has the pure red color can price higher for they are the rarest variety of coins that has ever been minted by the Philadelphia mint.

As you can see, we buy Classic Head large cents of 1808 to 1814. We will buy your coins no matter the grade and the condition. So, if you have Classic Head large cent coins, sell it to us and we will give you a good deal for your coins. Contact us now!

 

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