Coronet Head Cent (1816 – 1839)

#1 Coronet Head Cent Buyer Las Vegas & Henderson

History of Coronet Head Large Cents

The War of 1812 with Britain had resulted in a suspension in production for the one cent denomination at the United States Mint. As had been the case since the 1790’s, the planchet supply came from the British firm of Boulton & Watt, located in Birmingham.

As Napoleon’s troops prepared for their final battle against the armies of England and her continental allies in 1814, England’s second war against the United States seemed far removed from her vital national interests. During the two years of hostilities, British won the war however, harassing actions continued on the high seas and commerce affecting many aspects of American life.

Due to a trading embargo imposed after the start of the war, no new planchets could be shipped and the Mint’s supply on hand was eventually exhausted. But by 1814 the last of the imported copper blanks had been turned into cents of the “Classic Head” design. Although no copper planchets were available for coinage in 1815, this idle year proved useful, as it allowed a new obverse design to be engraved for cents and marked the beginning of a new era of mechanization and uniformity.

When planchets could once again be obtained, production of the denomination resumed with a new design by Robert Scot. The new design is the Coronet Head Large Cent and it begun its production in 1816.

The obverse featured the head of Liberty, facing left. Her appearance is more mature, at least in her 40’s or 50’s, and the head has been the basis of much criticism. Liberty wears a headband, inscribed with the word LIBERTY, and thirteen stars surrounds it. The date is inscribed below in a curved fashion. This design lasted until 1836 due to criticisms. It had been called “a spectacularly ugly head of Ms. Liberty”, while others have commented similarly with different words. Christian Gobrecht, best known for his work on the Liberty Seated silver and Liberty Head gold coins, made some modifications. The overall design was the same, but Liberty now had a slightly younger appearance, and the overall execution was better.

From 1816 until the end of the series in 1839 the same reverse design was used, which was basically identical to the earlier cents designed by John Reich. A wreath of olive leaves was featured, referred to as a “Christmas Wreath” and with the word ONE CENT inscribed in the center. A horizontal line appears beneath the letters EN in CENT. The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is inscribed near the rim in a semi-circle fashion. On the modified design executed by Gobrecht, the wreath is slightly lower, but the difference is minimal and goes largely unnoticed.

The new design was never considered to be a true improvement over the previous designs which had been seen on this denomination, yet it was the first design for the cent which lasted longer than a decade. Overall, the Coronet Head Large Cent lasted until 1839.

What is a Coronet Head Large Cent

The Coronet Head Large Cent was designed by Robert Scot with some modifications made by William Kneass and Christian Gobrecht in the later years. It started its production in 1816. The first design lasted of the Coronet Head large cent lasted until 1836. The second design, which bore few modifications, lasted until 1839.

The obverse in the first design features Lady Liberty with a more mature appearance, and is facing left. Lady Liberty is wearing a headband with the word LIBERTY inscribed on it. There are thirteen stars surrounding Liberty in a semi-circle fashion near the rim, and the date it was minted is inscribed below. The first design was made by Robert Scot.

On the second design, Christian Gobrecht just made a few modifications. He modified Lady Liberty’s appearance and he made her look younger. The headband is still there with the word LIBERTY on it. The thirteen stars are still there and with the date inscribed below the bust.

There were no changes made with the reverse design. It was still the same reverse that was previously used, and designed by John Reich. A wreath of olive leaves with the word ONE CENT inscribed at the center. The words UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounds it, and is placed near the rim.

Composition and Specifications of Coronet Head Large Cents

Coronet Head Cents were struck out of pure copper, with a weight of 10.89 grams (168 grains) and diameter of approximately 29 millimeters. All pieces were struck with a plain edge.

These are the three conditional factors that determine the value of a Draped Bust Large Cent coins and they are: Red (RD), RB (Red-Brown), BN (Brown). A RD coin is going to have at least 90% original luster as struck by the mint and is the most valuable condition. The luster conditions only apply to mint state coins so any circulated coin will be designated BN.

Specifications of Coronet Head Large Cent:
Designer: Robert Scot, after John Reich, with modifications by William Kneass and Christian Gobrecht
Circulation Mintage: high 6,370,200 (1838), low 2,111,000 (1836)
Proof Mintage: 10- 20 pieces per year except for 1839 (estimated)
Denomination: One cent (01/100)
Diameter: 27.5 mm (28-29 mm); plain edge
Metal Content: 100% copper
Weight: 10.89 grams
Varieties: They are two varieties of the obverse of 1817 design: one feature 13 stars , another 15. Another one is a small and large date of 1819 and 1820; and medium letters of 1829-1837 of which 1830 is especially valuable; 1823 Unofficial restrike from broken obverse die; 1826, 6 over 5; and 1834 Large 8 and stars, medium letters. A few known, including 1837 Plain Cord, Medium Letters, and Plain Cord, Small Letters; 1837 Head of 1838; 1839, 1839 Over 1836, Plain Cords; 1839 Head of 1838, Beaded Cords; 1839 Silly Head; 1839 Booby Head; and other minor die variations.

Identification of Proofs can be difficult, even for experts, as no true standards appear to have existed at the Mint. Generally speaking, a Proof tends to have reflective surfaces and a strong strike, although Proofs identified as such with some lightly struck points of the design also exist. A fully struck and reflective proof Coronet Head Large Cent usually is a joy to behold, being among the first Proof coinage ever struck by the United States Mint.

How We Grade Coronet Head Large Cents

These are the different grades of Coronet Head Large Cent:

  • Uncirculated: These are the coins that never made it out onto the open market. They normally have a brand new look or same as how it looked like when it was first minted way back in 1816.
  • Extremely Fine: These coins look the same as uncirculated but it has few minor scratches and chips. These imperfections are noticeable but nothing so large that it will detract from the appearance of the coin.
  • Fine: These coins were likely been circulated for over a long period of time. They have scratches and chips but the letters and numbers on the surface image can still be seen by the naked eye.
  • Good: These are the coins that have been heavily circulated and damaged. The letters and numbers worn away due to deep scratching and smoothing. Most good graded coins are in the worst condition.

We prefer coins that have been graded and certified as authentic by Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) or Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC), though we will still give a fair deal for these coins.

Price Quote for Coronet Head Large Cents

The were four major varieties of Coronet Head Large Cent and they are:

  • 1839/6 Coronet Head Large Cent – Plain Cords – Head of 1836
  • 1839 Coronet Head Large Cent – Beaded Cords – Head of 1838
  • 1839 Coronet Head Large Cent – Silly Head
  • 1839 Coronet Head Large Cent – Booby Head
    We have different estimated prices for each varieties of Coronet Head Large Cent.

For the Coronet Head large cents – Plain Cords, the price for Good graded coins reach up to $200; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $1000; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reach up to $9,000; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $90,000.

The Coronet Head large cents – Beaded Cords price for Good graded coins reaches up to $20; for the Fine graded coins, the prices can reach up to $30; while the price for Extremely Fine graded coins can range up to $100; and the Uncirculated graded coins reaches up to $500.

For the Coronet Head large cents – Silly Head, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $20; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $30; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $200; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $1,200.

While the Coronet Head large cents – Booby Head price for Good graded coins reaches up to $20; for the Fine graded coins, the prices can reach up to $30; while the price for Extremely Fine graded coins can range up to $100; and the Uncirculated graded coins reaches up to $1,100.

Uncirculated coins price higher than the other grades because it has never been used or circulated in the open market, and it looks brand new with no imperfections or scratches.

The Coronet Head large cents – Plain Cords coins price higher than those other varieties of Coronet Head large cent coins because of it was the first coins produced under this design. But those coins that has the pure red color or proofs can price higher for they are the rarest variety of coins that has ever been minted by the Philadelphia mint.

We buy Coronet Head large cents of 1816 to 1839. We will buy your coins no matter the grade and the condition. If you have Coronet Head large cent coins, sell it to us and we will give you a good deal for your coins. Contact us now!

 

 

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