Lincoln Cent (Wheat Reverse) (1909 – 1958)

#1 Lincoln Cent (Wheat Reverse) Buyer Las Vegas & Henderson

History of Lincoln Wheat Small Cents

In 1909, the Indian Head American penny was discontinued in favor of the Lincoln Wheat small cents, which commemorated the 100th birthday of President Abraham Lincoln. President Roosevelt considered Lincoln the savior of the Union, the greatest Republican President, and also he considered himself Lincoln’s political heir.

The only person invited to participate in the formulation of the new design was Victor David Brenner. President Theodore Roosevelt was so impressed with the talents of this outstanding sculptor that Brenner was singled out by the President for the commission. The likeness of President Lincoln on the obverse of the coin is an adaptation of a plaque Brenner executed several years earlier which had come to the attention of President Roosevelt.

The first year of the design includes the issues that prominently display on the reverse the initials of the designer, Victor D. Brenner, something that caused controversy at the time of release, even though designers initials had previously been placed on U.S. coins.

Lincoln cents were made of bronze most years, with a couple of variations during the years of World War II.  Those struck from 1909 through 1916 have a matte or satin finish, but production ended near the start of WWI. When production resumed in 1936, both satin and brilliant finish proof cents were minted, but thereafter proofs were brilliant finish only, until production ended again with the 1942 issue. Because copper was a critical war material, cents in 1943 were produced on zinc-coated steel planchets. No cent proofs were made during and immediately after the WWII years, from 1943 through 1949. That event resulted in the inadvertent creation of two Lincoln cent rarities, the first the copper cents dated 1943, the second the steel cents dated 1944. From 1944 through 1946 cents were produced from reused shell cases, whose bronze composition was nearly identical to the original issues, minus the tin.

A right-facing Lincoln is featured on the obverse. At the top, inside a raised rim and above Lincoln’s head inscribed are the words IN GOD WE TRUST. To the left of the portrait is LIBERTY, and to the right and slightly lower, the date. Lincoln Steel Wheat cents were minted at Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco; D and S mintmarks appear below the date. The designer’s initials VDB are located on the bottom bevel of Lincoln’s shoulder.

The reverse has a prominent display of the denomination ONE CENT at the top center, each word on a separate line, and below that UNITED STATES OF AMERICA in two lines. E PLURIBUS UNUM, with a center dot between the words, arcs along the top inside a raised rim. To both the left and the right of the center text, and curved to follow the rim, are stylized images of the seed head of wheat, called Wheat Ears by many, and the source for the type name.

The obverse and reverse designs remained on the cent coin for 50 years until the reverse was changed to include an image of the Lincoln Memorial instead of the wheatheads. Still, the obverse portrait of Lincoln remained and is still featured today on the smallest circulating strike of the United States.

What is a Lincoln Wheat Small Cent

Lincoln Wheat Small Cents replaced the previous design, Indian Head small cent in 1909. It was designed by Victor David Brenner with the orders of President Roosevelt to commemorate Lincoln’s 100th birthday.

The obverse of the coin features a bust of Abraham Lincoln adapted with minor changes from a plaque prepared by Brenner in 1907. The 16th President is facing to the right from the viewers point of view. The motto “IN GOD WE TRUST” appears above the portrait near the raised rim. The word LIBERTY is inscribed to the left and the date it was minted together with the mint mark to the right.

Brenner’s original reverse design features a pair of wheat stalks struck in both of the sides of the coin. The denomination ONE CENT is struck boldly in between of the stalks, and the words UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is inscribed below it. Above the denomination the Latin words “E PLURIBUS UNUM” appear, which translates to “Out of many, one.”

Composition and Specifications of Lincoln Wheat Small Cents

The Lincoln Cent has undergone a series of compositional changes during the long history of the series. The coins have alternately been struck in bronze, zinc coated steel, copper, and copper coated zinc.

One major compositional change occurred in 1943 when the need to conserve copper for the war prompted the Mint to produce pennies in zinc coated steel. This only lasted for one year, as the new composition was unpopular. For the following three years, the tin component was removed from cents before being replaced in 1947. The tin was ultimately removed in 1962.

These are the three conditional factors that determine the value of a Lincoln Wheat small Cent coins and they are: Red (RD), RB (Red-Brown), BN (Brown). A RD coin is going to have at least 90% original luster as struck by the mint and is the most valuable condition. The luster conditions only apply to mint state coins so any circulated coin will be designated BN.

  • Bronze Lincoln Cents:

Dates: 1909-1942, 1947-1962, 2009
Composition: 95% copper, 5% tin and zinc
Weight: 3.11 grams
Diameter: 19 mm

  • Zinc Coated Steel Lincoln Cents:

Date: 1943
Composition: steel coated with zinc
Weight: 2.70 grams
Diameter: 19 mm

  • Copper Lincoln Cents:

Dates: 1944-1946, 1962-1982
Composition: 95% copper, 5% zinc
Weight: 3.11 grams
Diameter: 19 mm

Designer: Victor D. Brenner
Circulation Mintage: high 1,435,400,000 (1944), low 866,000 (1931-S)
Proof Mintage: high 1,247,952 (1957), low 600 (1916)
Denomination: One cent (01/100)
Diameter: 19 mm; plain edge
Metal Content: 95% copper, 5% tin and zinc 1909-1942 and 1947-1958; steel, coated with zinc 1943; 95% copper, 5% zinc 1944-1946
Weight: 3.11 grams 1909-1942 and 1944-1958; 2.70 grams 1943
Varieties: Many known including 1909-S, S Over Horizontal S; 1917 Doubled-Die Obverse; 1922 No D and Weak D (from either a filled die or excessively polished die; Philadelphia did not produce cents in 1922); 1936 Doubled-Die Obverse; 1943 bronze and 1944 steel; 1944-D, D Over S; 1946-S, S Over D; 1955 Doubled-Die Obverse; 1956-D, D Above Shadow D; 1958 Doubled-Die Obverse; and other die doubling, over punches, and minor die variations.

How We Grade Lincoln Wheat Small Cent

These are the different grades of Lincoln Wheat Small Cent:

  • Uncirculated: These are the coins that never made it out onto the open market. They normally have a brand new look or same as how it looked like when it was first minted way back in 1909 to 1958.
  • Extremely Fine: These coins look the same as uncirculated but it has few minor scratches and chips. These imperfections are noticeable but nothing so large that it will detract from the appearance of the coin.
  • Fine: These coins were likely been circulated for over a long period of time. They have scratches and chips but the letters and numbers on the surface image can still be seen by the naked eye.
  • Good: These are the coins that have been heavily circulated and damaged. The letters and numbers worn away due to deep scratching and smoothing. Most good graded coins are in the worst condition.

We prefer coins that have been graded and certified as authentic by Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) or Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC), though we will still give a fair deal for these coins.

Price Quote for Lincoln Wheat Small Cents

We have different estimated prices for these years of production of Lincoln Wheat small cents. Prices varies from 1909-S VDB, 1909 to 1913, 1914 to 1916, 1917 to 1921, 1922 no D mint mark, 1922 to 1930, 1931 to 1942, 1943, 1943 to 1954, 1955, 1956 to 1958.

Lincoln Wheat small cents struck in 1922 and 1943 are key dates, that means thy cost higher than the other years.

For the 1909-S VDB Lincoln Wheat small cents, the price for Good graded coins reach up to $800; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $970; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reach up to $1,300; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $1,800.

For the 1909 to 1913 Lincoln Wheat small cents price for Good graded coins reaches up to $7.50; for the Fine graded coins, the prices can reach up to $11; while the price for Extremely Fine graded coins can range up to $70; and the Uncirculated graded coins reaches up to $180.

The 1914 to 1916 Lincoln Wheat small cents, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $26; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $33; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $89; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $350.

And the 1917 to 1921 Lincoln Wheat small cents, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $2; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $4; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $37; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $140.

While the 1922 no D mint mark Lincoln Wheat small cent, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $800; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $1,200; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $3,300; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $11,900.

The 1922 to 1930 Lincoln Wheat small cents, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $43; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $53; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $130; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $330.

For the 1931 to 1942 Lincoln Wheat small cents, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $80; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $100; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $150; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $180.

While the 1943 P/D Bronze/Copper Lincoln Wheat small cent, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $500; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $950; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $3,700; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $21,500.

The 1943 to 1954 Lincoln Wheat small cents, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $11; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $26; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to $70; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $270.

The 1955 Lincoln Wheat small cents, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $750; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $1,600; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to 2,100; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $4,000.

And the 1956 to 1958 Lincoln Wheat small cents, the price for Good graded coins can reach up to $3.50; for the Fine graded coins, it can reach up to $7.50; while the Extremely Fine graded coins reaches up to 26; and for the Uncirculated graded coins, it can reach up to $80.

Uncirculated coins price higher than the other grades because it has never been used or circulated in the open market, and it looks brand new with no imperfections or scratches.

We buy Lincoln Wheat small cents of 1909 to 1958. We will buy your coins no matter the grade and the condition. So, if you have Lincoln Wheat small cent coins, sell it to us and we will give you a good deal for your coins. Contact us now!

 

 

 

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